We make insight work for you.

30 years’ experience in health and social care

Fixed Fees

Preparing you for your hearing

Applicable to all health and social care professionals.

We are widely considered to be the leading legal representatives for medical professionals facing health and social care tribunals. Drawing on our experience, we have designed unique and practical courses with focus on impairment, reflections and remediation

 

Our Courses

 

Insight Works - Practical courses focusing on impairment, reflection, insight, and remediation for health and social care professionals.

Insight Works Complete

This course is suitable for any healthcare practitioner who is facing an investigation or hearing at work or before their regulator.

3 days – £1550 plus VAT

Insight Works - Practical courses focusing on impairment, reflection, insight, and remediation for health and social care professionals.

Insight Works Condensed

This course is suitable for any healthcare practitioner who is facing an investigation or hearing at work or before their regulator.

1 day – £550 plus VAT

Insight Works - Mentoring

Restoration Complete

This course is suitable for any healthcare practitioner who is considering making an application for restoration back onto the register, or for those who have started the application and who seek help and advice.

3 days – £1550 plus VAT

Insight Works Training

Restoration Condensed

This course is suitable for any healthcare practitioner who is considering making an application for restoration back onto the register, or for those who have started the application and who seek help and advice.

1 day – £550 plus VAT

Our Trainers

Healthcare professionals

We select leading healthcare experts with years of experience in mentoring and coaching who also sit on regulatory tribunal panels.

Legal professionals

We select leading legal experts in the field of defence at health and social care regulatory tribunals.

Why Insight Works?

30 years’ experience in health and social care

Designed by leading defence barristers

Unique mix of clinicians, mentors, and barristers

Clear goals and outcomes

Focus on your ability to demonstrate insight

Applicable to misconduct and competence allegations

What is Impaired Fitness to Practise

The general dictionary definition of impaired means weakened or damaged. In regulatory proceedings, it means that there are concerns about the registrant’s ability to practise safely and effectively. This may mean that they should not practise at all, or that they should be limited in what they are allowed to do.

Fitness to practise investigations exist to protect the public and maintain public confidence in the profession. They do not exist to punish healthcare professionals.

The reality is that sometimes things do go wrong.  When this happens, reflection is important for any healthcare professional to gain insight into the circumstances that led to the issue and from this to demonstrate learning from it.

Impairment can be found for a range of circumstances, which are not limited to clinical errors or misconduct.  It can also include, amongst other things, adverse health and/or language proficiency.

Many healthcare professionals believe that impaired fitness to practise simply applies to their ability to do their job and their level of knowledge, skills, and competence, however the terms encompasses a far wider meaning. Impairment is also about your health and good character, which in turn can have a negative impact on the reputation of your profession, your employer, and your regulator.

How do you reflect?

The general meaning of reflection is about giving thought and consideration to something.  

When things go wrong at work, professionals are often asked to consider not only what went wrong, but how and why things went wrong and what they can do to take future preventative measures. Clinically, this often happens as the result on an audit or if a serious incident occurs as part of an SI review or Root Cause Analysis exercise.

Similarly, as an individual healthcare professional it is important to be able to describe what happened, evaluate what happened, analysis the cause, contributory factors and impact on yourself and others so that steps can be taken, and measures put in place to highlight triggers and prevent any recurrence. 

This is often easier to achieve in competence cases rather than misconduct cases, particularly where there has been an element of dishonesty, but it is not impossible.

What is insight?

Insight is about being able to see or understand something clearly.  

Where things have gone wrong, assurances will need to be demonstrated that there will be a negligible risk and that any ongoing risk can be adequately managed.

It is a well-established fact that simply saying sorry is not enough. Insight and remediation must be genuine and demonstrable. 

Factors that can be relevant to genuine insight include evidence that the professional has considered the concern, understood what went wrong and accepted they should have acted differently by for example demonstrating that they fully understand the impact or potential impact of their performance or conduct.

Demonstrating remorse involves taking responsibility and exhibiting regret for their actions. This could include evidence that the professional has:

  • been open and honest about their wrongdoing and apologised;
  • undertaken appropriate remediation.
Remediation

The dictionary definition of remediation is righting a wrong or correcting a fault.

Remediation in regulatory proceedings is where the professional actively addresses concerns about their behaviour, skills, performance, or health. Remediation can take a number of forms:

  • participating in training, supervision, coaching and/or mentoring
  • attending courses relevant to the concerns raised, for example maintaining boundaries, ethics, or English language courses
  • evidence that shows what the professional has learnt following the events that led to the concerns being raised, and how they have applied this learning in their practice
  • evidence of good practice in a similar environment to where the concerns arose.

The quality of the steps taken to remediate the concerns is key to assessing the impact it has had or is capable of having. Remediation should be:

  • relevant – in that the steps taken to remediate have directly addressed the concerns identified
  • measurable – in that there is objective evidence available that helps understand what has been done and what, if anything, is left to be done, and
  • effective – in that there is enough information for the tribunal to see how any learning has been assessed and/or applied and its impact or success.